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this before, haven't we? what do average americans want to see in a fiscal cliff solution. we've got the exclusive results of our exclusive cnbc all-america economic survey. >>> now to everybody's all-american, sue herera standing by at the nyse. >> you're sweet, ty. thanks. >>> we're a little bit on the downside. we really kind of retraced a little bit on the dow jones industrial average. previous to this we were solidly in the green in all three of the major market indices. the dow now down 14 1/2 points. nasdaq up eight. the s&p is down just a fraction. of course we are also watching apple on the back of yesterday's drop. the stock today is traded up $4.82. that's just under a percentage move to the plus side. it's rebounding, still at bear market territory, however. it has lost over $50 billion in market cap over the past few days alone. our bob pisani joins me here on the floor of the nyse. what are you hearing from traders? the market is drifting a little bit. the focus is on apple. there seems to be a little bit of enthusiasm that it can come back to the up side. >> we were up
days to keep the nation from going over the so called "fiscal cliff" >> it appears americans don't mind sharing opinions.. even on things that don't exist. a recent poll by public policy polling found 25- percent of americans took a stance on a phony debt reduction policy called the "panetta-burns plan." the proposal was dreamed up by pollers to test how many people would speak on something they clearly don't know anything about. eight-percent of those polled supported the mythical plan and 17- percent in contrast, 39- percent of voters were willing to share their thoughts about the "simpson- bowles" deficit policy up for debate in >> you don't have to look >> >> nobody wants to get this done more than me. >> >> but key players aren't talking in the same room. congressional aides say they're not even >> the president is ready, willing and able, waiting to be able to sit down and seriously negotiate this but they have to be willing to come to the table with specifics. i think the next 72 hours >> some lawmakers are going back to their districts. congress has little scheduled business f
for on the fiscal cliff? look at every poll. americans largely agree with the president which is why they re-elected him. the president. >> when you look at the map it doesn't work. -- when you look at the math it doesn't work. we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> stephanie: we just talked about this earlier. a newly-released poll from "the washington post" and pew shows 53% of americans would blame republicans if we don't get a fiscal cliff agreement. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] the numbers are largely unchanged from the ones conducted right after the election. that's exactly what the president said. we're in the exit polls. to only 27% would blame obama if the country goes over the cliff. blah blah, blah. to that 64%ers who didn't believe it would have a major effect on the u.s. economy and 60% think that will be negative. who are republicans fighting for? not for a majority of americans. he's fighting for the top 2% who he says are actually small
backdrop to make his case to the american people about the fiscal cliff. yesterday treasury secretary tim geithner presented an offer to the congressional leaders including the stipulation that taxes go up on the wealthy. the headlines tell the story. "the washington post" wrote, "obama offers plan for cliff, not compromise." "the new york times." "gop balks at white house plan on fiscal crisis." and "the wall street journal," obama's cliff offer spurned. i want to bring in joanne reed and molly ball, political reporter for "the atlantic." good to see both of you. good morning. >> good to be here. >> mitch mcconnell, we are told, literally laughed at the white house's offer. and if you listen to speaker boehner, it's not going very well. take a listen. >> i'm disappointed in where we are and disappointed in what's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> and the speaker tweeted, "how serious is the white house about avoiding the fi
. dan, thank you. appreciate it. >> okay. >> so if the country falls off the fiscal cliff, 90% of all americans are going to feel the pinch. the average american house hoed will see taxes go up by more than $3,400. our next guest went to capitol hill and the white house today to do something about this. kristin, she is one of the co-founders of moms rising, an on-line group that add slow indicates for families. kristen, tell me about your group. you went to the hill today. you have a petition, and you got some teddy bears as well. what's the serious message behind this? >> well, moms rising has more than a million members across the country. moms who care about family economic security and care about our nation, and they sent in stories by the hundreds and hundreds and hundreds about how going off the fiscal cliff would impact them. today we went to congress, and we delivered those stories, in fact, to every member of congress saying don't put us in an un-bear-able situation. don't throw moms and families off a fiscal cliff. we need to act quickly to fix this situation for women and f
cliff which includes raising tax rats on higher-earning americans. >> we're not insisting on raises just out of spite or out of any kind of partisan bickering but rather because we -- we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> the president met with a group of ceos at the business round table and told them that he is hopeful that a deal can be reached in the following week that would head off the automatic tax hike and spending cuts from taking place in january. he said he has seen movement among republicans and that they might accept the tax hike if it is combined with entitlement reform and spending cuts. >>> te republican house majority leader told business leaders today president obama sms obsessed with raising tax. >>> we feel that's not the right direction to go, but we also feel that in that obsession is what he's about then let's at least do something about the spending problem. >> at the same meeth house speaker john baner said republicans have made a reasonable offer to the president with a balanced plan to raise revenues and cut spending. during a fla tla debate on the f
to take americans over the fiscal cliff. >> this is a thelma and louise crowd and want higheraxes and bigger government regardless of the impact on jobs and economy and america's standing in the world. >> gretchen: who could the fiscal cliff jumpers be. matt is editor in chief of the washington weekend. he's my guest. good morning. >> good morning. >> gretchen: who wants to go off of the cliff and die. >> buckle your seat. important senator is patti murray in charge of the democrat campaign committee. she got put in the position thinking it was not a good year for democrats and she turned into one. that gave her clout in the democratic caucus. when she gave a speech saying we could make a more liberal deal if we go off the cliff democrats started listening. >> gretchen: senator harry reid want to go off the cliff. >> he's playing the double game. he want to look like a deal make yer support the president. but so many democrats have a strange idea of compromise. it is all right. give me everything and i will do nothing. what we are seeing from the democrats, republicans you cave on
republicans in congress if you go over the fiscal cliff. how long can you have that hard above. -- how long can you afford politically to have those tax cuts? >> america faces a very serious problem and our goal is to make sure it gets solved. we have a debt problem that is out of control. we have got to cut spending and i believe it is appropriate to put revenues on the table. the receive news we are putting -- of the revenues we are putting from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes and have the same people pay more -- more of their money to the federal government without raising the tax rates which we believe will harm our economy. >>\[inaudible question] >> i think our members understand the seriousness of faces. trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. $16 trillion of debt on the books. every man, woman and child owing the american government $50,000 and that number is increasing every single year. as a result, our members understand that we've got to solve the problem, and we will. >> the house is going to leave today with two days le
, brian. coach, dsw and american eagle a dividend payment ahead of the fiscal cliff. oracle said it was moving up three of its 2013 quarterly payments to this year. that's a nice payday for the ceo larry ellison who will take home about $199 million. the marketplace editor for "the wall street journal," alsos a new father. >> oh, thanks, carl. >> you look way too rested. >> i know. i hope my boy is not watching me, that he's asleep and being a good boy. >> let's talk some dividends -- congratulations. i'm so happy for you. let's talk some dividends. is this for the good of all shareholders or purely a personal decision? >> well, i have to say smoke them if you've got them. right now the market is saying give us our dividends. if you go to the website you'll see a list of dividends and the percentage of insider holdings for those companies that have produced those you see some companies you mention ed where there's not a lot of insider interest. of course there are companies like oracle. larry ellison owns about a quarter that have company where there is substantial personal divid
will blame republicans and 29% would hold the president responsible if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. the two sides appear close to an agreement on little things. it could lead to higher airline ticket prices and no more mail delivery on saturday. >> oh, boy. susan mcginnis in washington this morning. susan, thank you so much. one of the tax breaks due to expire next month is the payroll tax. that's the tax listed on your pay stub as fica. the money you pay into social security and medicare. it was reduced by two percentage points during the recession. jim axelrod has more. >> reporter: the payroll tax cut has given this family an extra $70 a month to spend. john is a maintenance man in jersey city, new jersey. >> are you paying any attention to what's going on in washington right now? >> of course. >> reporter: their $50,000 a year income put them almost exactly in the middle of the american household. if it's not extended those $1,035 more. >> do you have room to cut back? >> no. >> reporter: if the tax cut expires paycheck contributions will go from 4.2% to 6.2%. that's $115 bill
about the fiscal cliff and some of the issues surrounding that. we are going to look at a specific issue of so-called tax extenders a little bit later with sam goldfarb. he will also be talking about tax issues in general when it comes to the fiscal cliff. if you have questions about tax issues or comments about how taxes should be included in these discussions, he will be taking your calls. up next, we're going to have a look at republicans and the fiscal cliff negotiations with radio talk-show host and columnist armstong williams. that is coming up next as we continue the "washington journal." ♪ >> why a writers institute? i think it is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page. but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps -- but it is something -- there is something in literature that captures the humans. . >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new y
the house budget committee where elements of a fiscal cliff deal are to be considered. meanwhile president obama held his ground insigs on higher tax rates for the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. >>> the political wrangling but a damper on wall street as stocks finished slightly lower in a light strad trading day. the dow jones industrial lost 13, the nasdaq shed 5. shares in oakland-based pandora are plum etting after hours. the internet radio company posted better-than-expected quarterly results but lowered its outlook for the rest of the fiscal year. the company is facing stiffer competition from the likes of apple and microsoft. both companies are launching their own music service. pandora shares dropped 17% after the closing bell. >>> now, numbers and new numbers show home sales in california remain steady, a sign of the recovering housing market, but as john reports, in one bay area community, the supply of homes on the market is as tight as can be. >> tuesday's in walnut creek are normally reserved for real estate brokers to tour each other's available homes, but today the inven
. >> host: what are the obstacle of the fiscal cliff? >> guest: it's an optimist in the christmas season. we got right to the last minute before what could've been a government shutdown in april of 2011. because the last minute on the fiscal cliff. i don't think it's a good way to do business. >> host: if we were to go over, what happens? >> guest: well, you know, probably congress would be back in session pretty quickly and hopefully we would do something like i'm talking about right now. that's what we should do it early. and continue to negotiate. it's not just a question of dollars and cents. effort some people say let the race club in republicans get some data call that a tax cut. people lose faith in the institution and the political leadership. trust is a very funny commodity. you have it until you don't. when you lose the trust of the american people it's not like you get back to doing the right thing the next day. we should convince the country and the markets that can make smart decisions and to compromise and again this would be a step in the right direction of showing we can work
on the wealthy. you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> it republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a the a time when the american economy was doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> while geithner was drawing a line in the sand, house speaker john boehner was busy trying to lift his jaw off the flar after geithner presented the president's debt reduction plans to him last week. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i have just never seen anything like it. >> yes, indeed, it seems that republicans are not quite sure what to make of the president taking a harder line across the bargaining table. >> you know, the president's idea of a negotiation is roll over and do what i ask. >> i think we're going over the cliff. it's pretty clear to me they made a political calculation. the president's plan is just, quite frankly, a joke. >> i'm not sure about that, senator graham, but there will be plenty of time for jokes later this evening with every member of cong
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
've got a fiscal cliff now. we have the fiscal abyss next year. we need to say, don't come home. no deal, no break. members should be in washington at least five days a week like every other american and not leave until they deal with the fiscal cliff this year or until we get a grand bargain next year. they would pull off seven times more days -- >> david faber tweeted this morning that they should be locked in a room and forced to listen to the animal orchestra until they have a deal. >> david faber's hair. >> you put them in a room. you tell them they're going to sit there until the deal is done. day three, no more food. day five, no water. day seven, the waterboarding begins. that would get it done. >> and the president should be there, too. >> the president does work five days a week. >> but not in the same room. but he is home. he's already home. >> but listen, they spend too much time raising money. if they did a good job, they wouldn't have to raise as many money. if they got paid for performance, they wouldn't have any money. >> are you going to run for linda mcmahon's seat? >>
: a tweet -- now? mike, an independent caller in wisconsin. caller: the fiscal cliff and are 100 trillion dollar debt, mostly it's the fault of the american people. i blame congress in general for not having the courage to tell us the truth, but it is the american people who don't want to deal with that is essentially forcing this thing. host: 1 cumene? hat do you mean? caller: we have unsustainable debt. it has to be reformed. for decades we have been electing politicians will tell us what we want to hear, but we cannot pay for the programs we want. until the american people themselves can deal with the truth, we're not going to solve this. contacting our politicians, offering sacrifice of the programs we like is the only solution. until then, politicians will not have the courage to cut the programs that we simply tell them not to touch. host: here is the editorial in the wall street journal this morning -- rick? caller: it's like a bar tab. we are the runs that ran up the bartec. our grandchildren will ultimately have to pay it until we realize we have to stop drinking and start paying
to do in the short term is avoid the fiscal cliff. the major decisions with regard to tax reform, social insurance programs, et cetera, can't and shouldn't be made until next year, after the american people are engaged and the committees do their work. >> david gergen, how do you get the political solution that opens the door to the policy conversations? >> well, i was encouraged that the republicans actually came forward with something today. a lot of people thought they would not. the president as you know, his team rejected it late this afternoon, but nonetheless, if people truly want to find a bridge to avoid the fiscal cliff, a way to get to the big issues as david walker says would have to come next year, i think they're the makings of it here. each side will have to compromise some more. each side will have to eat a little crow but i think it's imperative that the president take the view that what he's looking for is a win-win. if they take a win-win approach, i think they can get a deal. >> comment on that point. if two wrongs don't make a right but the two nonstarters maybe make
not be sitting around twiddling our thumbs. the clock is running. we face a fiscal cliff. there are some in this chamber who have said, oh, we need to go off of it. we'll go off of it. we'll pay the price and then we'll finally sit down and do what's right. i would, with all due respect, say that's pretty stupid. >> that was some blunt talk from my next guest, republican senator from georgia, johnny isaacson. that was two and a half weeks ago. the more things change, the more they stay the same. both the president and house republicans have offered their own solutions to the fiscal cliff. but we're no closer to a deal. joining me now is senator isa isaacson. good morning, senator isaacson. i assume you stand by what you said just two weeks ago. so let me ask you this. the initial offer by speaker boehner, is it fair to say -- is it fair that the white house is calling it an unserious offer since it doesn't do anything on tax rates? >> no, i dent think so at all. i think it's more reflective of a simpson-bowles. it's a first step. i made a living selling houses for 33 years. i don't get p
for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration. the question is, though, is this going to be a big enough deal, and will actually be enough of a down payment that it will lead to something else subsequently that will actually avoid the kind of enormous consequences of $16 trillion of debt? that percentage will be lower than the 80%. >> let's come back to the big picture -- in the short term, by january 1 -- will we avoid the cliff? >> i think it is likely that we avoid it. it does not appear that that is going so well. it is so easy for us just to do the things we need to do. i think the real line in the sand is going to be the debt ceiling. i really do think -- i have sai
the fiscal cliff? but the g.o.p. is not so keen on a deal, at least the one the white house presented yesterday. the first offer from president obama and treasury secretary timothy geithner included a $1.6 trillion tax increase along with an extension of the payroll answer it cut and unemployment insurance and a request for $50,000,000,000 worth of stimulus spending next year. now, it doesn't promise $400,000,000,000 worth of spending cuts but congressional republicans call the deal unbalanced and unreasonable and saying there is not enough spending cuts and reforms. the one good piece of -- piece of good news to the white house on this is it shows president obama is opening strong not conceding. we will be right back. arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them, you're put on this planet for something more. i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action themselves. as a human being, that's really important.
-- [inaudible] 53% of americans will blame republicans in congress if you go over the fiscal cliff. how long can you have that hard line on those making 250 and above. >> america faces a very serious problem and our goal is to make sure it gets solved. we have a debt problem that is out of control. we have got to cut spending and i believe it is appropriate to put revenues on the table. the receive news we are putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes and have the same people pay more -- more of their money to the federal government without raising the tax rates which we believe will harm our economy. [inaudible question] >> i think our members understand the seriousness of the situation that our country faces. trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. $16 trillion of debt on the books. every man, woman and child owing the american government $50,000 and that number is increasing every single year. as a result, our members understand that we've got to solve the problem, and we will. >> the house is going to
manufacturer and pennsylvania. he spoke about the fiscal cliff negotiations. this is what he had to say. [video clip] >> the reason i am here is i want the american people to urge congress soon to begin the work we have by doing what we all agree on. both parties agreed we should extended the middle-class tax cuts. we have disagreements about the high end tax cuts. republicans do not want to raise taxes on people like me. i think i can pay a little more to make sure kids can go to college and we can build roads and invest so we are finding cures for alzheimer's. that is something we have to sort out. we already all agree on making sure middle-class taxes do not go up. host: this president's trip was covered in the "the new york post." back to the telephones with our discussion regarding the fiscal cliffs. ryan is the next caller. caller: i would like somebody to call and on the republic of mine and tell me with these george w. bush tax cuts over the past eight years, where are the jobs? if tax cuts create jobs, where are they at? that is one point. when speaker john boehner talks about obamacar
as part of a balanced approach to deficit reduction and the fiscal cliff. he will not accept a deal that has specific cuts in spending, in entitlement programs that asks middle class americans, seniors who need loans, disabled children to pay a price on the one hand, and the promise, the vague promise, the unspecified promise of a revenue that appears from wealthier americans in the future. that's not a deal the president will not sign. >> i understand the process and what the white house is looking for from republicans, but i'm asking about the president's position. a yes-or-no question. his position that the tax rate has to go to 39.6% on january 1. >> he will not sign the bush tax cuts for wealthy americans. they have rates for top earners at 35%. if you don't sign it, it's up to 39.6 #, the top rate. that's a fact. secondly, he has not seen a single proposal or acknowledgement that a proposal is necessary or will be forthcoming from republicans that even it would be part of the balanced deal. we are now where we are in december, and we need congress, republican leaders in congre
the fiscal cliff. eye roncally enough, something the house of representatives passed last may. in april set out a tax plan. in may passed a sequestration plan, went to the senate and said we're going to see you in the lame duck time period. we're in the lame duck and this had has to be solved. we have to solve the problem. the first thing is to define what the problem even is. it seems one group is talking about the real problems, the fiscal cliff, and the other group is talking about the real problem, the debt and deficit. what is the real issue? we have $16.3 trillion in debt as a nation. $1 trillion of overspending or each year for the last four years. let me set the example of what this really means. in 2007, our tax revenue, how much we were bringing in the treasury, is almost exactly what it is in 2012. from 2007 to 2012, the revenue is almost identical. the difference is our spending has gone up $1 trillion a year. from 2007 to 2012. so over the course of that time it's slowly built up. but each year we've been over $1 trillion in spending. while our revenue has stayed consistent bas
%, is this really a fiscal cliff issue, or are there bigger challenges, competition, your incredibly high cost structure? >> if you're looking at the competitive question, look at the results we just reported again, reported over $62 million americans listen to pandora just in november for the first time, we represented over 7% share of all radio listening in this country. clearly the american embrace of pandora personalized radio continues at an extraordinary pace, so i think we did reduce guidance. i think it's prudent because of the unique situation we have we're sensitive to the mix add in january as opposed to february and march. >> but many analysts would say user costs are prohibitively high. more than half of your revenue goes toward the licensing fees. what would you do if legislation to lower these costs is not passed? >> whether legislation is passed or not, we believe the rates we pay are unfairly high, and we will participate in an arbitration that begins in 2014 to set the rates for 2016 through 2020. we are already preparing for that and we very much look forward to making our c
up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in himself, admitting talks are going nowhere. speaker boehner also described the moment when secretary geithner first showed him the president's opening offer. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said, "you can't be serious." i've just never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. right now i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)